Young Upstarts

All about entrepreneurship, intrapreneurship, ideas, innovation, and small business.

Finding A Mentor To Better Your Business

by Sara Fletcher

Whenever you’re embarking on a project, be it big or small, one of the most valuable steps in ensuring the success is seeking counsel. You do your research and you get advice from knowledgeable, experienced people who’ve done it before or who have specialized in what you’re trying to achieve. The information and guidance that you can get from people who’ve already invented your wheel, can aid in making decisions that ultimately govern the triumphs of your project.

The same goes for business. Whether you have a small start-up company or an already thriving larger corporation, finding a mentor for your business is a sure fire way to keep your dealings, products and services relevant, appealing, insightful and stable. While you are ultimately culpable for any executive decisions you make that will affect your business, it’s an inspiring comfort to know that you can rely on a seasoned and straightforward expert to offer clarity and assistance.

Ok, so now you know the benefits of having a mentor for your business, the next step is getting one. It isn’t a difficult undertaking but one that requires you to be thorough and unrelenting – you get what you give type deal. Think of it as if you were hiring a new employee or a consultant. There are several things you should do when you’re ready to make the leap:

1. Check around the house.

Before you pull the binoculars out, look closer to home. Run your ideas by the people that know you and know your work. Without divulging your trade secrets, you can seek advice from trusted friends and family members who can act as fresh sets of eyes. These people have intimate knowledge of how you think and can many times offer advice that is prudent and immediately mindful of your limitations and apprehensions.

2. Comb your network.

Within your business network there must exist one or two trusted associates with whom you can comfortable confer. They are excellent resources and share or have shared your work-related challenges, rendering them able to provide a wealth of information and reference resources. You can even try picking the brain of a former boss who not only knows your industry, but knows you – two factors that will help your cause.

3. What your Government and the Internet can do for you.

The government actually wants your business to succeed because when it does, it stimulates the economy favorably for everyone. Likewise, there are many companies that operate virtually that offer mentorship services for little to no cost at all.

Take advantage of all your mentor has to offer, be proactive and organized, ask everything and take notes, be vigilant and diligent and be respectful of time; yours and theirs. You also don’t have to limit yourself to one mentor – you can chose two or three from different avenues to help broaden your perspective because while there are some hard and fast ways of expanding your prerogative, every person can offer something new.


Sara Fletcher is interested in emotional intelligence, and how it relates to every aspect of our lives. She loves to explore psychology, business, and sports in relation to emotional intelligence training.

This is an article contributed to Young Upstarts and published or republished here with permission. All rights of this work belong to the authors named in the article above.

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